Review: Come Back to Me by Thomma Lyn Grindstaff

28824613Title: Come Back to Me

Author: Thomma Lyn Grindstaff

Publication Date: January 31, 2016

Publisher: Amazon

Genre: New Adult, Fantasy, Romance, Mystery

Goodreads Synopsis:

For Annasophia and Maestro, their love is ageless, and music is their door through time.

Annasophia Flynn is a young, classically-trained pianist and singer-songwriter who enjoys a special bond with Wilhelm Dahl, her older mentor and teacher whom she affectionately calls Maestro. Maestro is terminally ill, and Annasophia must come to grips with the fact that she’ll have to say goodbye to him soon.

But not so fast. Annasophia receives a mysterious email to which is attached a photo of her standing by the side of a virile and much-younger Maestro, years before she was born and during the height of his fame and power as a concert pianist. Either somebody’s doing some serious Photoshopping, or Annasophia traveled — or will travel — back in time, meaning that there’s more to her relationship with Maestro than meets the eye.

She visits Maestro in the hospital and shows him the photo. When he talks about a mysterious door and hums a few bars of a romantic Rachmaninoff concerto much beloved by them both, she is compelled to go home and play the piece on her piano. The concerto indeed turns out to be a door back through time, where she meets the younger Maestro, and they fall in love.

But staying in younger Maestro’s time proves tricky. For one thing, he has a son, who will never be conceived or born if Annasophia stays and changes things. She starts to second guess herself and tries to go back to her own time, only to find, each time, that the timeline as she has known it has been altered. For another thing, Maestro’s very elegant and cunning ex-wife, Elena, is determined to get him back and makes up her mind to do everything she can to send Annasophia back to her own timeline for good, where she will have to say goodbye to Maestro forever.


3 / 5 Stars


Come Back to Me starts off in Annasophia’s present. Her piano teacher, Maestro, is deathly ill. Maestro has been Annasophia’s mentor since she was very young. She can’t imagine life without him.  As she deals with his illness, she receives a photo of a young Maestro and a woman who looks startlingly like herself. The young woman in the picture looks deeply in love with the man standing next to her. It couldn’t possibly be Annasophia, could it?

When she approaches Maestro about the strange photo, Annasophia learns something she never dreamt possible. She can travel through time. Annasophia then travels through time to unravel the mystery of the photo and her relationship with Maestro.

I hate to say it, but Come Back to Me is just one of those books that’s not for me. The writing was good and the concept of the story was intriguing. I found the idea of music as the machine in this time travel romance very creative and interesting. I just had a hard time connecting with the characters.

If you read my blog, you’ll know one of the relationship tropes I dislike is the student-teacher relationship. I just find crossing those boundaries very wrong. That was my big problem with Come Back to Me. While Annasophia is an adult in this novel and during her relationship with Maestro, it made reading their shared experiences as Annasophia grew up kind of disturbing. I just couldn’t fall in love with their romance because of that.

Come Back to Me is a book well suited for fans of time travel mysteries and readers who don’t mind a little forbidden romance.

**I received an electronic copy of Come Back to Me in exchange for an honest review.

 

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One thought on “Review: Come Back to Me by Thomma Lyn Grindstaff

  1. Pingback: WWW Wednesday: February 24, 2016 | a novel glimpse

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